Info

Spread across a backlit surface like a Kandinsky painting, the disassembled Kismet head reveals the mechanisms (an updated second-generation version with a neck that "cranes") that allow it to manipulate its cartoonish lips, eyes, and ears into expressions that seem startlingly human. This next generation Kismet head is called K2. Chris Morse spent two hours taking it apart for us. Cynthia Breazeal developed Kismet at MIT in Cambridge, MA. From the book Robo sapiens: Evolution of a New Species, page 67.

Filename
USA_rs_425_qxxs.jpg
Copyright
© 2000 Peter Menzel, www.menzelphoto.com, robo Sapiens
Image Size
750x1024 / 238.9KB
Contained in galleries
Spread across a backlit surface like a Kandinsky painting, the disassembled Kismet head reveals the mechanisms (an updated second-generation version with a neck that "cranes") that allow it to manipulate its cartoonish lips, eyes, and ears into expressions that seem startlingly human. This next generation Kismet head is called K2. Chris Morse spent two hours taking it apart for us. Cynthia Breazeal developed Kismet at MIT in Cambridge, MA. From the book Robo sapiens: Evolution of a New Species, page  67.