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As Mark Tilden's Spyder 1.0 approaches like a tiny but menacing arachnid, its circuits try to optimize actions, walking in this case, with minimal energy. Perturbed by the environment, its patented "nervous net" seeks the minimum state, its legs moving almost randomly until it succeeds. In 1990, Spyder 1.0 was the first walking robot to use Tilden's nervous net control system. When Tilden first achieved such complex behavior from such minimal components, the results astonished some roboticists. Los Alamos, NM. From the book Robo sapiens: Evolution of a New Species, page 118-119.

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© 2000 Peter Menzel, www.menzelphoto.com, Robo Sapiens
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As Mark Tilden's Spyder 1.0 approaches like a tiny but menacing arachnid, its circuits try to optimize actions, walking in this case, with minimal energy. Perturbed by the environment, its patented "nervous net" seeks the minimum state, its legs moving almost randomly until it succeeds. In 1990, Spyder 1.0 was the first walking robot to use Tilden's nervous net control system. When Tilden first achieved such complex behavior from such minimal components, the results astonished some roboticists. Los Alamos, NM. From the book Robo sapiens: Evolution of a New Species, page 118-119.