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Seeming to touch the objects on his screen, Peter Berkelman, then a graduate student at the Carnegie Mellon Robotics Institute in Pittsburgh, PA, scoops up virtual blocks with a special device that communicates the sensation of touching them. The device, which has a handle suspended in powerful magnetic fields, can move with all six possible degrees of freedom: up and down, side to side, back and forth, yaw, pitch, and roll. Used with special "haptic" software the device has force-feedback. From the book Robo sapiens: Evolution of a New Species, page 136.

Filename
USA_rs_27A_120_qxxs.jpg
Copyright
© 2000 Peter Menzel, www.menzelphoto.com, Robo Sapiens
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752x1024 / 424.6KB
Contained in galleries
Seeming to touch the objects on his screen, Peter Berkelman, then a graduate student at the Carnegie Mellon Robotics Institute in Pittsburgh, PA, scoops up virtual blocks with a special device that communicates the sensation of touching them. The device, which has a handle suspended in powerful magnetic fields, can move with all six possible degrees of freedom: up and down, side to side, back and forth, yaw, pitch, and roll. Used with special "haptic" software the device has force-feedback. From the book Robo sapiens: Evolution of a New Species, page 136.