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Man Eating Bugs: The Art and Science of Eating Insects book image

In the Cambodian town of Siem Reap, the gateway to the ruins of Angkor Wat, an ingenious device is popular among the townspeople for catching crickets. A black light is hung above a plastic sheet that glows with an ultraviolet hue attractive to insects. The crickets are attracted to the light, land on the sheet, and slip down into a bucket of water, where they promptly drown. The Liemh family deep-fries the crickets and sells them in the local market for 6,000 riels, $2.50 US, per small basket. Siem Reap, Cambodia. (Man Eating Bugs: The Art and Science of Eating Insects page 50)

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©1998 Peter Menzel / Man Eating Bugs / www.menzelphoto.com
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In the Cambodian town of Siem Reap, the gateway to the ruins of Angkor Wat, an ingenious device is popular among the townspeople for catching crickets. A black light is hung above a plastic sheet that glows with an ultraviolet hue attractive to insects. The crickets are attracted to the light, land on the sheet, and slip down into a bucket of water, where they promptly drown. The Liemh family deep-fries the crickets and sells them in the local market for 6,000 riels, $2.50 US, per small basket.  Siem Reap, Cambodia. (Man Eating Bugs: The Art and Science of Eating Insects page 50)