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(1992) At the Home Office of the Forensic Science Service in Aldermaston, England, John Bark and Linda Nelson discuss the results of a DNA profile of blood and semen samples taken from a pair of pants. The blood will be removed, and then analyzed using DNA fingerprinting techniques. This will enable the scientist to determine whether the blood belonged to the victim or the assailant. Hanging up in the foreground are various DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid) autoradiograms from other DNA fingerprinting studies. DNA consists of two sugar- phosphate backbones, arranged in a double helix, linked by nucleotide bases. There are 4 types of base; adenine (A), cytosine (C), guanine (G) and thymine (T). Sequences of these bases make up genes, which encode an organism's genetic information. The bands (black) on the autoradiogram show the sequence of bases in a sample of DNA. MODEL RELEASED

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(1992) At the Home Office of the Forensic Science Service in Aldermaston, England, John Bark and Linda Nelson discuss the results of a DNA profile of blood and semen samples taken from a pair of pants. The blood will be removed, and then analyzed using DNA fingerprinting techniques. This will enable the scientist to determine whether the blood belonged to the victim or the assailant. Hanging up in the foreground are various DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid) autoradiograms from other DNA fingerprinting studies. DNA consists of two sugar- phosphate backbones, arranged in a double helix, linked by nucleotide bases. There are 4 types of base; adenine (A), cytosine (C), guanine (G) and thymine (T). Sequences of these bases make up genes, which encode an organism's genetic information. The bands (black) on the autoradiogram show the sequence of bases in a sample of DNA. MODEL RELEASED