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Matthew Jones, wearing 3-D glasses to view computer simulations, from the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) experiment, seen with a computer-simulated collision event between an electron and a positron. The SLC produces Z-zero particles by this collision process, which takes place at extremely high energies. The Z-zero is one of the mediators of the weak nuclear force, the force behind radioactive decay, and was discovered at CERN in 1983. The scientist is seen wearing special glasses that enable viewing of computer- generated stereoscopic images of the particle tracks following the collision inside the Large Detector. The first Z-zero seen at SLC was detected on 11 April 1989. MODEL RELEASED [1988]

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USA_SCI_PHY_08_xs.jpg
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© Peter Menzel www.menzelphoto.com
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Matthew Jones, wearing 3-D glasses to view computer simulations, from the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) experiment, seen with a computer-simulated collision event between an electron and a positron. The SLC produces Z-zero particles by this collision process, which takes place at extremely high energies. The Z-zero is one of the mediators of the weak nuclear force, the force behind radioactive decay, and was discovered at CERN in 1983. The scientist is seen wearing special glasses that enable viewing of computer- generated stereoscopic images of the particle tracks following the collision inside the Large Detector. The first Z-zero seen at SLC was detected on 11 April 1989. MODEL RELEASED [1988]