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(1992) Forensic use of DNA fingerprints. A scientist taking a sample from a bloodstained pair of jeans. DNA from the sample is then sequenced, providing a DNA fingerprint (such as those seen at the edges of the frame). This may then be compared with DNA from the victim and any suspect. In some cases, this may be used in conjunction with other evidence to positively link a suspect with both the victim and the scene of a crime. Modern amplification techniques allow DNA sequences to be taken from extremely small samples, such as a few spots of blood or a few hair follicles. (Scientist here is J. Bark). MODEL RELEASED

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(1992) Forensic use of DNA fingerprints. A scientist taking a sample from a bloodstained pair of jeans. DNA from the sample is then sequenced, providing a DNA fingerprint (such as those seen at the edges of the frame). This may then be compared with DNA from the victim and any suspect. In some cases, this may be used in conjunction with other evidence to positively link a suspect with both the victim and the scene of a crime. Modern amplification techniques allow DNA sequences to be taken from extremely small samples, such as a few spots of blood or a few hair follicles. (Scientist here is J. Bark). MODEL RELEASED