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Wedged into her small, cluttered workspace in the MIT Artificial Intelligence Laboratory in Cambridge, MA., researcher Cynthia Breazeal holds a mirror to Kismet, the robot head she has been working on for two years. The cameras behind Kismet's big blue eyes send data to its computer, which has software allowing the robot to detect people and bright toys visually. In addition, the software recognizes people by vocal affect. Then, following its programming, it reacts, twisting its features in a comically exaggerated display of emotion. From the book Robo sapiens: Evolution of a New Species, page 66.

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USA_rs_124_qxxs.jpg
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© 2000 Peter Menzel, www.menzelphoto.com, Robo Sapiens
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1024x692 / 348.1KB
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Wedged into her small, cluttered workspace in the MIT Artificial Intelligence Laboratory in Cambridge, MA., researcher Cynthia Breazeal holds a mirror to Kismet, the robot head she has been working on for two years. The cameras behind Kismet's big blue eyes send data to its computer, which has software allowing the robot to detect people and bright toys visually. In addition, the software recognizes people by vocal affect. Then, following its programming, it reacts, twisting its features in a comically exaggerated display of emotion. From the book Robo sapiens: Evolution of a New Species, page 66.