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Robonaut, with an acrylic head, holds a drill with socket attachment at the Johnson Space Center, Houston. That NASA's teleoperated humanoid-type robot, called Robonaut, has no legs is by design, because in space, says project leader Robert Ambrose, an astronaut's legs can be a big impediment to fulfilling the mission of a spacewalk. The latest version of Robonaut has two arms, a Kevlar and nylon suit, updated stereo eyes, and is getting heat sensing capability. Possibly the most significant change is the move from total teleoperation to some level of autonomy.

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Robonaut, with an acrylic head, holds a drill with socket attachment at the Johnson Space Center, Houston. That NASA's teleoperated humanoid-type robot, called Robonaut, has no legs is by design, because in space, says project leader Robert Ambrose, an astronaut's legs can be a big impediment to fulfilling the mission of a spacewalk. The latest version of Robonaut has two arms, a Kevlar and nylon suit, updated stereo eyes, and is getting heat sensing capability. Possibly the most significant change is the move from total teleoperation to some level of autonomy.