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Sitting on a mobile motorized cushion he calls a "vuton," Shigeo Hirose of the Tokyo Institute of Technology surrounds himself with some of the robots he has built in the last two decades. Beside him is the snake-bot ACM R-1, one of his earliest projects. It is made of modules, any number of which can be hooked together to produce a mechanical snake that slowly, jerkily undulates down its path. Hirose, who is primarily funded by industry, hopes to develop commercially useful robots; the snake, he thinks, could be useful for inspecting underground pipes. Japan. From the book Robo sapiens: Evolution of a New Species, page 88.

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Japan_JAP_rs_25_qxxs.jpg
Copyright
© 2000 Peter Menzel, www.menzelphoto.com, Robo Sapiens
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Sitting on a mobile motorized cushion he calls a "vuton," Shigeo Hirose of the Tokyo Institute of Technology surrounds himself with some of the robots he has built in the last two decades. Beside him is the snake-bot ACM R-1, one of his earliest projects. It is made of modules, any number of which can be hooked together to produce a mechanical snake that slowly, jerkily undulates down its path. Hirose, who is primarily funded by industry, hopes to develop commercially useful robots; the snake, he thinks, could be useful for inspecting underground pipes. Japan. From the book Robo sapiens: Evolution of a New Species, page 88.