Share
twitterlinkedinfacebook
Image 1 of 1
EGY_080322_157_xxw.jpg
Camel broker Saleh Abdul Fadlallah with his day's worth of food at the Birqash Camel Market outside Cairo, Egypt. (From the book What I Eat: Around the World in 80 Diets.) The caloric value of his day's worth of food on a typical day in the month of April was 3200 kcals.  He is 40 years of age; 5 feet, 8 inches tall; and 165 pounds. Contrary to popular belief, camels' humps don't store water; they are a reservoir of fatty tissue that minimizes the need for heat-trapping insulation in the rest of their bodies; the dromedary, or Arabian camel, has a single hump, while Asian camels have two. Camels are well suited for desert climes: their long legs and huge, two-toed feet with leathery pads enable them to walk easily in sand, and their eyelids, nostrils, and thick coat protect them from heat and blowing sand. These characteristics, along with their ability to eat thorny vegetation and derive sufficient moisture from tough green herbage, allow camels to survive in very inhospitable terrain. MODEL RELEASED.